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Archive for the Communication Skills Category

When to Shut Your Pie Hole at Work

When to Shut Your Pie Hole at Work

We live in an age of “sharing,” when everyone seems to have a profoundly important opinion about everything, especially how OTHERS should behave. But sometimes the best career advice is to just shut up.

Keeping your mouth shut can be a big career booster, especially when it seems that so many have forgotten this basic lesson.

1. Customer’s do not want to hear conversations between employees.

I went to Whole Foods for lunch the other day and spent way too much on a kale salad, but I always take a big scoop of salmon dip from the free tasting platter (and TWO crackers) just to even things out.

When I got to the cashier, she was in the middle of a conversation with a fellow employee. I think they were debating the nutritional benefits of hard vs. soft tofu. Or maybe it was kale vs. spinach. At some point the cashier glanced at me and smiled as she scanned the price code on my recycled paper salad container, but continued the conversation with her workmate. She only paused long enough to tell me the price. “Five hundred dollars,” I think she said. Now, the actual delay might have been only 20 seconds, but it felt a lot longer because it seemed as if I was invisible to both of them the entire time.

This less-than-great customer service experience probably won’t keep me from going back to Whole Foods, but next time I’m taking an even bigger scoop of the free salmon dip.

My point is that when you are in any customer-facing situation, be very conscious of the conversations you have with coworkers. Even if you think you are alone in an aisle, customer’s in other aisles can still hear your banter. And of course the worst thing you can do is complain about customers within earshot of other customers.

2. Colleagues do not want to hear how you have been “wronged” at work.

Bhodi Sanders interviewed for a regional manager position at his company and in his mind there was no question that he was the best qualified candidate. So when someone from outside the company was selected for the position, a woman with very little practical experience in their specific industry, he was frustrated and angry. Which was a natural, understandable reaction.

Bhodi couldn’t contain his frustration and took every opportunity to tell his colleagues at work how badly he had been wronged. At first they were sympathetic, some even agreeing with him. But months later when the topic was still coming up, people began talking about his inability to let it go. Their perception of Bhodi shifted, he seemed small and catty to his colleagues, and when the next regional manager position opened up, he wasn’t even considered.

Here’s the truth: at some point (maybe at many points) in your career, you are going to be “wronged.” And while it is perfectly natural to want to tell others and gain their validation, this isn’t fair to your colleagues at work. Your complaints put pressure on them and ultimately can hurt your career potential.

How you respond to being wronged at work will tell others a lot about your character. If Bhodi had swallowed his pride and then focused on helping the new regional manager become successful in her role, people would have noticed. If Bhodi had been willing to self-reflect and seek to authentically understand why he wasn’t selected, in a positive and productive manner, people would have noticed.

So the bad situation could have been turned into a positive for Bhodi, but in this case it didn’t. His career flat-lined for a few years, and then he moved on to a new employer. By the way, his new colleagues get to hear his sob story many, many times. You can decide how you think this ultimately impacted his career with the new employer.

3. Colleagues do not want to hear about your sexual adventures or “conquests,” nor your alcholol-fueled antics.

Honestly I’m surprised that I even have to address this, but I’ve heard enough stories from people whose colleagues think it is appropriate that I want to at least mention it. Beyond the legal issue of creating an uncomfortable work environment for some people, it’s also really just stupid.

I have a strong libertarian streak in me and pass no judgement on what people do in their personal lives. You can sleep with whoever, drink or inject whatever, and I really don’t care. But if you bring it into the workplace,  even by just mentioning it, you are opening yourself up to the judgement of others.

So on Monday morning when someone asks “How was your weekend,” your response should NEVER include any of these words or phrases:

  • Hooking up
  • Molly
  • Tinder
  • Jello shot
  • Hookah
  • Ginger Pubes

… I think that’s enough. You either get it by now, or you don’t

 4. No one at work needs to hear your political/social commentary.

Almost every business depends upon the ability of a diverse workforce to work together productively. People with different backgrounds and perspectives need to be able to align their efforts and work as a cohesive team – which means it is almost always best to avoid conversation topics that have the potential to be intensely divisive including:

  • Politics
  • Social Justice
  • Religion
  • Sex
  • Whether LinkedIn should ban or censor photos of “babes.”

There are plenty of opportunities at work to have great conversations with people, without creating division, discomfort or hurt feelings. And when someone else crosses the line, this should not be viewed as permission for you to do the same. Sometimes the very best thing to say is… nothing.

The Bold Beauty of Plain Language

The Bold Beauty of Plain Language

So much of the language we experience today seems overcomplexificated.

Too many obtuse phrases and three-letter acronyms. Not enough real insight.

And sometimes, just too damn much.

In business, some think their opaque jargon makes them sound smarter. In academia and other bureaucracies the “inside language” grows organically and makes some feel more important. Some people confuse quantity with quality in their email messages and blog posts. And in politics and marketing, some use clever, slippery language to obfuscate meaning and win sales, votes or political influence. Read more

The Holy Grail of Effective Communication

The Holy Grail of Effective Communication

For more than 20 years I have been helping organizations and individuals improve their communication effectiveness in both professional and personal settings. I have developed and delivered training on a wide variety of communication topics: presentation skills, high-impact writing, active listening, understanding communication styles, speaking with clarity and brevity, how to have “tough” conversations about difficult topics…and the list goes on.

On occasion during a workshop someone will ask me to identify the most important communication skill – usually this means they have become overwhelmed by too much information and feel they cannot assimilate all of the communication skills, habits and techniques being delivered – so they want to know… what is the ONE technique they should definitely learn. Read more

Stop Drowning in Mail: 4- Step System to Manage Mail Overload

email

 

BY ROBERT PAGLIARINI

You can simplify your life and even avoid information pornography, but if you’re like most people, your email inbox is still bursting at the seams, your voice mail is full, and you’re getting slammed with too much stuff.

To make matters worse, you get flooded with old-fashioned mail. It’s a cause of real stress and anxiety. Why? In the wise words of Newmanfrom Seinfeld: “Because the mail never stops. It just keeps coming and coming and coming, there’s never a let-up. It’s relentless. Every day it piles up more and more and more!” [Watch this clip on YouTube]

To avoid going Newman, er, I mean postal, you need an effective system to capture and process your mail quickly. The key to any system is to make sure it works when life is calm but also when you are crazed and have a hundred things going on at once.

If you follow these four steps, you will be able to control your mail once and for all. It might seem like a lot of work initially, but once you set this up, it will run smoothly and effortlessly.

Step 1 – Dump

You’ll need one big bin labeled “Unsorted Inbox.” Whenever you get the mail, you can dump it all into this bin, or if you have some time, you can skip directly to the “Sorting” step below.

Step 2 – Sort

If there are multiple people in your house that receive mail, you will still need an Unsorted Inbox bin, but you’ll also need a separate inbox tray for each person. For example, if you’re married and have two high school children, you would need one inbox bin and four trays-one for each family member. Each of the trays should be marked with a family member’s name (e.g., Robert’s Inbox, Mary’s Inbox).

If Junior grabs the mail as he’s heading out to football practice, he can throw everything into the Unsorted Inbox. Then when mom comes home and has a few extra minutes, she can take everything out of the Unsorted Inbox and sort it (i.e., go through each piece of mail and dispense it to the correct inbox.

Step 3 – Screen

Screening is the process of going through your inbox and separating the important mail from the not-so-important and putting it into the following three trays/folders/baskets:

– Magazines/Catalogs

– “Junk” Mail to Shred (junk mail that doesn’t need to be shredded can be tossed immediately during this step)

– Everything Else

If there are multiple people at your house, ideally each person would not only have their own inbox but they would also have their own three screening trays. I like the idea of making the inboxes portable so you can pick up your inbox and take it with you to the den, bedroom, office, etc. and Screen/Process on your own turf. Plus, you won’t have 100 bins/trays clogging up your kitchen.

Step 4 – Process

Once your mail has been screened, you then need to process it.  Processing your mail involves opening it and determining what the next action is:

Magazines/Catalogs – No rush to do anything here. You can let these pile up, and then when you have down time, you can go through them. If you’re heading to the doctor, dentist, or getting your oil changed, grab a handful of magazines/catalogs to take with you while you wait.

“Junk” Mail to Shred – The action here is to shred this stuff.  Keep a shredder nearby so you can quickly and easily get rid of this mail.

Everything Else – This is the meat of your mail. When you go through the Everything Else tray, you’ll probably throw some things away that may have looked important but was actually junk mail. But for most of the contents in the Everything Else tray, there will be some action to take such as pay a bill, read a letter, review a bank statement, etc.

You can either do whatever action is required right then, or you can put mail with like actions in the same folder. For example, you can create a “Pay Bills” folder and put all of your bills in it. Twice a month you can grab all the bills from this folder and pay them. Or you can have a “Statements Review” folder where you would put all of your bank and investment account statements you want to review at some later point.

The number of action folders is really up to you. Start with a few basics such as “Pay Bills” and “Statements Review.” If you discover there is another recurring action, you can then create a folder for it.

You can’t stop the mail (just ask Kramer), but you can certainly manage it. But what about all of the other documents and information in your life? I’m glad you asked. I’m working on a series that will help you take back control of your life and all the stuff in it. Because when you aren’t drowning in information and mail, you can spend more of your other 8 hours writing booksbecoming a better public speaker,investing in yourselflearning, and creating.

Strategies for Successful Interviewing

The job interview is a brief, but crucial, component of the employment process.  If you are thinking of re-entering the working world after a hiatus or starting to look for a new opportunity after a long tenure with your current firm, it’s wise to brush up on what to expect during an interview.

Especially if the position you’re interviewing for involves managing a large office and juggling numerous administrative responsibilities, the ability to present yourself well and inspire confidence is critical. By taking note of these key interview strategies, you can make the best possible impression and land the position you seek. Read more

The Ultimate Secret to Fast Learning

Fast Learning

Want to pick up a new skill?

Don’t we all. And we also want it to happen fast, so fast.

And preferably without any effort as well.

Well, I do have one secret that at least will “make it feel” like there’s no effort. And I can guarantee that it will speed up your progress. Here’s the secret. Read more

The ‘C’ Compliant Profile

DISC-Model-CBy Dan Rust for Frontline Learning

At the extreme, this type of individual tends to perceive the environment as an “unsafe” place over which he or she has little or no control.This drives a tendency towards caution and compliance, and dependency upon structure, order, data, and “following the rules” to provide some degree of certainty in an uncertain world.

General Characteristics: You can typically count on this person to be accurate; analytical. Conscientious; careful. Fact-finder; precise. High standards; systematic.

Value to Team: Perspective: “the anchor of reality.” Conscientious and even-tempered. Thorough to all activities. Defines situation; gathers, criticizes and tests information.

Possible Weaknesses: Needs clear-cut boundaries for actions/relationships. Bound by procedures and methods. Gets bogged down in details. Prefers not to verbalize feelings. Will give in rather that argue.

Greatest Fear: Criticism.

Motivated By: Standards of high quality. Limited social interaction. Detailed tasks. Logical organization of information.

Ideal Environment: Tasks and projects that can be followed through to completion. Specialized or technical tasks. Practical work procedures and routines. Few conflicts and arguments. Instructions and reassurance that they are doing what is expected of them.

DISC-Model-1

Click above image for a summary of the complete DISC behavioral style model

Remember a “High C” May Want: Autonomy and independence, controlled work environment, reassurance, precise expectations and goals, exact job descriptions, planned change.

DO: Prepare your case in advance. Delineate pros and cons of proposed ideas. Support ideas and statements with accurate data. Reassure them that no surprises will occur. Submit an exact job description with a precise explanation of how that task fits into the big picture. Review recommendations with them in a systematic and comprehensive manner. Be specific when agreeing. Disagree with the facts rather than the person when disagreeing. Be patient, persistent, and diplomatic while providing explanations.

DON’T: Refuse to explain details. Answer questions vaguely or casually.

While analyzing information, a High C may: Become overly cautious and conservative. Get too bogged down in details. Avoid or postpone decisions, especially if they perceive a risk. Be an effective trouble-shooter.

C’s possess these positive characteristics in teams: Instinctive organizers. “Do it yourself” managers – create and maintain systems. Strive for a logical, consistent environment. Control the details. Conscientious. Evaluate the team’s progress. Ask important questions. Maintain focus on tasks. Offer conservative approaches. Emphasize quality. Think logically. Will share risks and responsibilities. Work systematically. Will strive for consensus. Diplomatic. Analyze obstacles.

Personal Growth Areas for C’s: Concentrate on doing the right things, not just doing things right. Be less critical of others’ ideas and methods. Respond more quickly to accomplish team goals. Strive to build relationships with other team members. Be more decisive. Focus less on facts and more on people. Take risks along with other team members.

This person’s tendencies include:

  • Following directives and standards
  • Concentrating on detail
  • Working under controlled circumstances
  • Being diplomatic with people
  • Checking for accuracy
  • Criticizing performance
  • Critical thinking
  • Complying with authority

This person desires an environment which includes:

  • Security assurances
  • Standard operating procedures
  • Sheltered environment
  • Reassurance
  • No sudden or abrupt changes
  • Being part of a group
  • Personal attention
  • Status quo unless assured of quality control
  • Door openers who call attention to accomplishments

This person needs others who:

  • Desire to expand authority
  • Delegate important tasks
  • Make quick decisions
  • Use policies only as guidelines
  • Compromise with the opposition
  • State unpopular positions

To be more effective, this person needs:

  • Precision work
  • Opportunity for careful planning
  • Exact job and objective descriptions
  • Work associates of equal competence
  • Scheduled performance appraisals
  • As much respect for people’s personal worth as for what they accomplish
  • To develop tolerance for conflict

Click on any of the boxes below for more details on each of the primary behavioral tendencies: Dominant (D), Interactive (I), Supportive (S), and Compliant (C).

DISC-Model-CDISC-Model-SDISC-Model-IDISC-Model-D

Many Frontline Learning products incorporate the DISC behavioral mode, promoting a greater understanding of interpersonal influences and tendencies to enhance sales productivity, customer service effectiveness and general personal competency. The following Frontline Learning products incorporate some form of the DISC behavioral profile:

  • Professional Selling SkillMap™
  • Customer Service SkillMap™
  • Emotional Effectiveness SkillMap™
  • REAL Selling™
  • REAL Coaching™
  • REAL Marketing™

The ‘I’ Interactive Profile

DISC-Model-IBy Dan Rust for Frontline Learning

At the extreme, this type of individual tends to perceive the environment as a safe and supportive place over which he or she has a high degree of control.This drives a tendency towards enthusiastic expression of thoughts and ideas and well as encouragement of others. But there is also the potential for over-expression and over-sharing of thoughts and ideas. May be inattentive to detail and feel “ambushed” when surprised to find that a particular individual or group is not supportive.

General Characteristics: Enthusiastic. Trusting; Optimistic. Persuasive; Talkative. Impulsive; Emotional

Value to Team: Creative problem solver. Great encourager. Motivates others to achieve. Positive sense of humor. Negotiates conflicts; peace maker.

Possible Weaknesses: More concerned with popularity than tangible results. Inattentive to detail. Over-uses gestures and facial expressions. Tends to listen only when it’s convenient.

Greatest Fear: Rejection.

Motivated By: Flattery, praise, popularity, and acceptance. A friendly environment. Freedom from many rules and regulations. Other people available to handle details.

Ideal Environment: Practical procedures. Few conflicts and arguments. Freedom from controls and details. A forum to express ideas. Group activities in professional and social environments

Remember a High I May Want: Social esteem and acceptance, freedom from details and control, people to talk to, positive working conditions, recognition for abilities, opportunity to motivate and influence others.

DO: Build a favorable, friendly environment. Give opportunity for them to verbalize about ideas, people and their intuition. Assist them in developing ways to transfer talk into action. Share testimonials from others relating to proposed ideas. Allow time for stimulating, sociable activities. Submit details in writing, but don’t dwell on them. Develop a participative relationship. Create incentives for following through on tasks.

DISC-Model-1

Click above image for a summary of the complete DISC behavioral style model

DON’T: Eliminate social time. Do all the talking. Ignore their ideas or accomplishments. Tell them what to do.

While analyzing information, a High I may: Lose concentration. Miss important facts and details. Interrupt. Be creative in problem solving.

I’s possess these positive characteristics in teams: Instinctive communicators. Participative managers – influence and inspire. Motivate the team. Spontaneous and agreeable. Respond well to the unexpected. Create an atmosphere of well-being. Enthusiastic. Provide direction and leadership. Express ideas well. Work well with other people. Make good spokespersons. Will offer opinions. Persuasive. Have a positive attitude. Accomplish goals through people. Good sense of humor. Accepting of others. Strong in brainstorming sessions.

Personal Growth Areas for I’s: Weigh the pros and cons before making a decision; be less impulsive. Be more results oriented. Exercise control over your actions, words, and emotions. Focus more on details and facts. Remember to slow down your pace for other team members. Talk less; listen more. Consider and evaluate ideas from other team members. Concentrate on following through with tasks.

This person’s tendencies include:

  • Contacting people
  • Making a favorable impression
  • Articulate verbalizing
  • Creating a motivational environment
  • Generating enthusiasm
  • Entertaining people
  • Desiring to help others
  • Participating in a group

This person desires an environment which includes:

  • Popularity, social recognition
  • Public recognition of ability
  • Group activities outside of the job
  • Democratic relationships
  • Freedom from control and detail
  • Opportunity to verbalize proposals
  • Coaching and counseling skills
  • Favorable working conditions

This person needs others who:

  • Concentrate on the task
  • Seek facts
  • Speak directly
  • Respect sincerity
  • Develop systematic approaches
  • Prefer dealing with things to dealing with people
  • Take a logical approach
  • Demonstrate individual follow-through

To be more effective, this person needs:

  • Control of time, if D or S is below the midline
  • Objectivity in decision-making
  • Participatory management
  • More realistic appraisals of others
  • Priorities and deadlines
  • To be more firm with others if D is below the midline

 

Click on any of the boxes below for more details on each of the primary behavioral tendencies: Dominant (D), Interactive (I), Supportive (S), and Compliant (C).

DISC-Model-CDISC-Model-SDISC-Model-IDISC-Model-D

Many Frontline Learning products incorporate the DISC behavioral mode, promoting a greater understanding of interpersonal influences and tendencies to enhance sales productivity, customer service effectiveness and general personal competency. The following Frontline Learning products incorporate some form of the DISC behavioral profile:

  • Professional Selling SkillMap™
  • Customer Service SkillMap™
  • Emotional Effectiveness SkillMap™
  • REAL Selling™
  • REAL Coaching™
  • REAL Marketing™

The ‘D’ Drive/Dominance Profile

DISC-Model-DBy Dan Rust for Frontline Learning

At the extreme, this type of individual tends to perceive the environment as an “unsafe” place over which he or she has a high degree of control.This drives a tendency towards bold action and decision-making, but also the potential for being overstepping boundaries, taking on too many tasks and bulldozing others.

General Characteristics: Direct. Decisive. High Ego Strength. Problem Solver. Risk Taker. Self Starter.

Value to Team: Bottom-line organizer. Places value on time. Challenges the status quo. Innovative.

Possible Weaknesses: Oversteps authority. Argumentative attitude. Dislikes routine. Attempts too much at once.

Greatest Fear: Being taken advantage of.

Motivated By: New challenges. Power and authority to take risks and make decisions. Freedom from routine and mundane tasks. Changing environments in which to work and play.

Ideal Environment: Innovative focus on future. Non-routine challenging tasks and activities. Projects that produce tangible results. Freedom from controls, supervision, and details. Personal evaluation based on results, not methods.

DISC-Model-1

Click above image for a summary of the complete DISC behavioral style model

Remember a “High D” May Want: Authority, varied activities, prestige, freedom, assignments promoting growth, “bottom line” approach, and opportunity for advancement.

DON’T: Ramble. Repeat yourself. Focus on problems. Be too sociable. Make generalizations. Make statements without support.

While analyzing information, a High D may: Ignore potential risks. Not weigh the pros and cons. Not consider others’ opinions. Offer innovative and progressive systems and ideas.

D’s possess these positive characteristics in teams: Autocratic managers – great in crisis. Self-reliant. Innovative in getting results. Maintain focus on goals. Specific and direct. Overcome obstacles. Provide direction and leadership. Push group toward decisions. Willing to speak out. Generally optimistic. Welcome challenges without fear. Accept risks. See the big picture. Can handle multiple projects. Function well with heavy work loads.

Personal Growth Areas for D’s: Strive to be an “active” listener. Be attentive to other team members’ ideas until everyone reaches a consensus. Be less controlling and domineering. Develop a greater appreciation for the opinions, feelings, and desires of others. Put more energy into personal relationships. Show your support for other team members. Take time to explain the “whys” of your statements and proposals. Be friendlier and more approachable.

This person’s tendencies include:

  • Getting immediate results
  • Causing action
  • Accepting challenges
  • Making quick decisions
  • Questioning the status quo
  • Taking authority
  • Causing trouble
  • Solving problems

This person desires an environment which includes:

  • Power and authority
  • Prestige and challenge
  • Opportunity for individual accomplishment
  • Wide scope of operations
  • Direct answers
  • Opportunity for advancement
  • Freedom from controls and supervision
  • Many new and varied activities

This person needs others who:

  • Weigh pros and cons
  • Calculate risks
  • Use caution
  • Structure a more predictable environment
  • Research facts
  • Deliberate before deciding
  • Recognize the needs of others

To be more effective, this person needs:

  • Understanding they need people
  • Techniques based on practical experience
  • An occasional shock
  • Identification with a group
  • To verbalize the reasons for conclusions
  • An awareness of existing sanctions
  • To pace self and relax more

 

Click on any of the boxes below for more details on each of the primary behavioral tendencies: Dominant (D), Interactive (I), Supportive (S), and Compliant (C).

DISC-Model-CDISC-Model-SDISC-Model-IDISC-Model-D

Many Frontline Learning products incorporate the DISC behavioral mode, promoting a greater understanding of interpersonal influences and tendencies to enhance sales productivity, customer service effectiveness and general personal competency. The following Frontline Learning products incorporate some form of the DISC behavioral profile:

  • Professional Selling SkillMap™
  • Customer Service SkillMap™
  • Emotional Effectiveness SkillMap™
  • REAL Selling™
  • REAL Coaching™
  • REAL Marketing™

Understanding Behavioral Styles

DISC-5By Dan Rust for Frontline Learning

Four-factor “DISC” behavioral models are ubiquitous in the world of corporate training and development today. A simple Google search produces over a hundred different DISC-style behavioral profiles, assessments and surveys, all based upon the same fundamental research.

The best way to make sense of all these options is to start with a baseline understanding of the underlying model for these assessments, and that is the goal of this article. I’m not a psychologist or a psychometrics expert, but I have leveraged a broad range of DISC-style assessments over the past 20 years. When I explain the DISC behavioral model to others in a practical, straightforward manner, it helps them make better decision regarding which specific assessment to use, and how to leverage it most effectively in their corporate training program.

So let’s start at the beginning. The search for understanding regarding our distinct personalities and the nature of human interaction is as old as humanity itself. The age-old question is, “Why do people do what they do?” The Greek philosopher, Hippocrates (400 BC), believed in four distinct personality styles; choleric, sanguine, phlegmatic, and melancholy. Although Hypocrites’ theory has no medical validity, it was the first substantial method for categorizing types of behavior.

Hippocrates’ theory was expanded upon at the turn of the 20th century by a number of behavioral scientists. Carl Gustav Jung (1921), a Swiss psychologist, was one of the most influential modern behavioral theorist. In 1921 he published “Psychological Types” which described four psychological functions: thinking, feeling, sensation, and intuition. Jung also classified these four types further by calling them either “introverted” or “extroverted.”

The DISC Behavioral ModelDISC-Model-safety

The development of the DISC behavioral profile as we know it was primarily due to the work of the American psychologist, Dr. William Moulton Marston. He was an expert in behavioral understanding. In 1926 he published “The Emotions of Normal People” in which he outlined the essence of the modern DISC behavioral model. Until that time, this type of work was confined to criminally insane and mentally ill people.

Marston observed (in “normal” people) a behavioral continuum with two extremes. Based upon his observations he grouped people along two axis:

  1. Either antagonistic or favorable view of the environment.
  2. Either active or passive tendencies within their environment.

In other words, when people instinctively perceive their environment (at home, at work, etc.) do they feel “safe?” Do they perceive others within their environment as supportive or antagonistic, or somewhere in between? This is about instinctive perception, not objective reality. Some of us can walk into a room of strangers and immediately feel comfortable. Some of us can sit at a dinner table with a supportive family and feel uncomfortable or unsafe. Of course most of us fall somewhere between the two extremes.

DISC-Model-control

The other axis Marston focused on was the degree to which individuals are instinctively active or passive in their environment. Do they perceive themselves to have a high degree of control (active) or to have little or no control (passive) over their environment? Marston observed that this behavioral element was independent of perceived “safety.” Some individuals who perceive  an unsafe environment are instinctively passive, they view themselves as having little or no control over their environment. Others who also perceive an unsafe environment tend to be more active or assertive, because they perceive themselves to have a high level of control over their environment.

DISC-Model-3

An important point to reinforce is that Marston observed that these instinctive perceptions tended to remain consistent for an individual no matter what the objective reality of the environment might be. So an individual who tends to perceive the world as a safe, friendly place – where he or she has little or no control over the environment – will tend to have this same instinctive perception even when the environment is un-supportive, and even when he or she is given full control over the environment.

DISC-Model-4

By viewing individuals through the prism of these two behavioral continua, the four DISC-model quadrants are created and the four behavioral styles were formed: Dominance (D), Inducement (I), Steadiness (S), and Compliance (C).

DISC-Model-1

 Since Marston, many individuals have contributed to the maturation of the DISC behavioral model. It became a common tool for the US military’s recruiting process before the second World War. Today companies frequently use it to choose the most appropriate candidate for their employment, sifting out countless other applicants.

 

Click on any of the boxes below for more details on each of the primary behavioral tendencies: Dominant (D), Interactive (I), Supportive (S), and Compliant (C).

DISC-Model-CDISC-Model-SDISC-Model-IDISC-Model-D

Many Frontline Learning products incorporate the DISC behavioral mode, promoting a greater understanding of interpersonal influences and tendencies to enhance sales productivity, customer service effectiveness and general personal competency. The following Frontline Learning products incorporate some form of the DISC behavioral profile:

  • Professional Selling SkillMap™
  • Customer Service SkillMap™
  • Emotional Effectiveness SkillMap™
  • REAL Selling™
  • REAL Coaching™
  • REAL Marketing™

 

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